Log

Energetics of the Brain and AI

Sapience Technical Report STR 2016-02

Author: Anders Sandberg

Does the energy requirements for the human brain give energy constraints that give reason to doubt the feasibility of artificial intelligence? In Energetics of the Brain & AI I review some relevant estimates of brain bioenergetics and analyze some of the methods of estimating brain emulation energy requirements.

Turning to AI, there are reasons to believe the energy requirements for de novo AI to have little correlation with brain (emulation) energy requirements since cost could depend merely of the cost of processing higher-level representations rather than billions of neural firings. Unless one thinks the human way of thinking is the most optimal or most easily implementable way of achieving software intelligence, we should expect de novo AI to make use of different, potentially very compressed and fast, processes.

Contents

  • Computer and brain emulation energy use
  • Brain energy use
  • Information dissipation in neural networks
  • Energy of AI

Cite as: Anders Sandberg. “Energetics of the Brain & AI”. Sapience Project, Technical Report STR 2016-2, February 2016

Full Report

Related posts:

The Singularity Controversy, Part I

Sapience Technical Report STR 2016-1 Author: Amnon H. Eden ‘The Singularity Controversy, Part I: Lessons Learned and Open Questions: Conclusions from the Battle on the Legitimacy of the Debate‘ informs policy makers on the nature and the merit of the arguments for and against the concerns associated with a potential technological singularity. Part I describes the lessons learned from our investigation of the subject, separating the arguments of merit from the fallacies and misconceptions that confuse the debate and undermine its rational resolution.

Unethical Research: How to Create a Malevolent Artificial Intelligence

Sapience Technical Report STR 2016-03 Author: Roman V. Yampolskiy Cybersecurity research involves publishing papers about malicious exploits as much as publishing information on how to design tools to protect cyber-infrastructure. It is this information exchange between ethical hackers and security experts, which results in a well-balanced cyber-ecosystem. In the blooming domain of AI Safety Engineering, hundreds of papers have been published on different proposals geared at the creation of a safe machine, yet nothing, to our knowledge, has been published on how to design a malevolent machine.

Leave a Reply