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Five More Lessons about Documentation: A follow-up to Mark Birch’s “Developer Documentation”

Last week’s DevBizOps blog entry (“Developer Documentation: Developers don’t like writing docs, what’s the alternative?“) asked: How programmers can get their answers from documentation, and are there alternatives? As ever Mark’s post advises on questions every developer has to ask in understanding software. Open source or proprietary, documentation is necessary either for using, extending, or changing software. The costs of searching for answers are known to developers and project managers. Empirical literature and decades of research in software comprehension and reverse engineering show that the costs of understanding software are significant. What, then, can be done? We offer five more lessons in addition to Mark’s post, presented as “formulas”:

The Singularity Controversy, Part I

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