Log

Singularity Hypotheses: A Scientific and Philosophical Assessment

Amnon H. Eden, Johnny H. Soeraker, James H. Moor, Eric Steinhart (eds.) The Frontiers Collection, Springer 2013

A significant advance in singularity scholarship

Ted Goertzel, Professor of Sociology, Rutgers University

The best introduction I know to some profound debates about our future as a species

David Christian, Professor, Macquarie University, Sydney

Riveting … insightful commentaries on [the] continuing co-evolution of computing and humanity

Grady Booch, Chief Scientist for Software Engineering, IBM Research

Singularity Hypotheses: A Scientific and Philosophical Assessment offers authoritative essays and critical commentaries on central questions relating to accelerating technological progress and the notion of technological singularity.

Further information

Related posts:

Five More Lessons about Documentation: A follow-up to Mark Birch’s “Developer Documentation”

Last week’s DevBizOps blog entry (“Developer Documentation: Developers don’t like writing docs, what’s the alternative?“) asked: How programmers can get their answers from documentation, and are there alternatives? As ever Mark’s post advises on questions every developer has to ask in understanding software. Open source or proprietary, documentation is necessary either for using, extending, or changing software. The costs of searching for answers are known to developers and project managers. Empirical literature and decades of research in software comprehension and reverse engineering show that the costs of understanding software are significant. What, then, can be done? We offer five more lessons in addition to Mark’s post, presented as “formulas”:

Leave a Reply