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The Singularity Controversy, Part I

Sapience Technical Report STR 2016-1

Author: Amnon H. Eden

The Singularity Controversy, Part I: Lessons Learned and Open Questions: Conclusions from the Battle on the Legitimacy of the Debate‘ informs policy makers on the nature and the merit of the arguments for and against the concerns associated with a potential technological singularity.

Part I describes the lessons learned from our investigation of the subject, separating the arguments of merit from the fallacies and misconceptions that confuse the debate and undermine its rational resolution.

Cite As: Amnon H. Eden. “The Singularity Controversy, Part I: Lessons Learned and Open Questions”. arXiv:1601.05977 [cs.AI], Sapience Project, Technical Report STR 2016-1 (January 2016), DOI 10.13140/RG.2.1.3416.6809

Contents

  • Studying the Singularity
  • Conclusions drawn
    • Singularity = Acceleration + Discontinuity + Superintelligence
    • Which singularity do you mean? AI or IA?
    • Some ‘singularities’ are implausible, incoherent, or no singular
    • Pulp “singularities” are not scientific hypotheses
    • The risks of AI arise from indifference, not malevolence
    • The risk of AI is essentially like the risk of any powerful technology
    • We’re not clear what “artificial intelligence” means
    • The debate hasn’t ended; it has barely begun
  • Open Questions
    • Can AI be controlled?
    • AI or IA?
    • Can we prove AIs are becoming more intelligent?
 Full Report

 

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